Saturday, 12 May 2012

BIO-RESONANT PROPULSION: UFO Propulsion Part 2.

PLASMA AND VACUUM STRUCTURES: HARAMEIN

ABSTRACT

"We examine the collective coherent structures of plasma and their interactions with the vacuum. In this paper we present a balance equation and, in particular, the balance between extremely collapsing gravitational systems and their surrounding energetic plasma media. Of particular interest is the dynamics of the plasma media, the structure of the vacuum, and the coupling of electromagnetic and gravitational forces... 
The exotic nature of complex black holes involves not only the black hole itself but the surrounding plasma media. The main forces involved are intense gravitational collapsing forces, powerful electromagnetic fields, charge, and spin angular momentum. We find soliton or magneto-acoustic plasma solutions to the relativistic Vlasov equations solved in the vicinity of black hole ergospheres.

1. Introduction
"In this paper we present a generalized model of the balance between the gravitational and electromagnetic fields near or at the ergosphere of a blackhole... Magnetism will arise in the vacuum induced by polarization by the rotation of a gravitational body such as a pulsar or black hole... The vacuum is a potential source of electrons, positrons as well as other particles when activated by a polarizing energy source [3].

"Our new and unique approach of developing the relativistic Vlasov equation, formulated and solved in the vicinity of black holes does, indeed, describe the electromagnetic phenomena of a dense plasma under a strong gravitational field. 

"Black holes act as an electric generator power source of quasars which emit the light of an entire galaxy... The plasma dynamics in the external region generates electric field gradients and hence current flow and induces intense magnetic fields across the ergosphere... Magnetic lines of force pass across the sphere, exciting its surface with eddy currents producing drag on the sphere... Astrophysical effects on the (black holes) occur through the effects of their excited states of the dense plasma on the vacuum.

"Of course, the motion of the magnetic field by the dynamic processes near a black hole generates an electric field which can give us a quantitative method to describe the energy transfer mechanisms... The magnetic field lines carry current which are driven by the voltage difference to distant parts of a quasar, which are linked by the magnetic field lines and the vacuum state polarization in its environment, producing a gigantic direct current circuit...  Positive charges flow up the field lines from the equatorial regions of the surface and are balanced by the current from the polar field lines to the equatorial lines... As the lines of magnetic force thread through the ergosphere, energy is deposited in the intervening plasma, accelerating it outward against the strong magnetic field... 

"In this paper, we express in detail the balance equations between the gravitational collapsing system and the surrounding plasma. Balance systems act in a thermo-plasma-gravitationally coupled systems that obey unique structures in space, some of which we present in this volume..."


STUDY:


JOURNAL OF SCIENTIFIC EXPLORATION
A Publication of the Society for Scientific Exploration
AIMS AND SCOPE: The Journal of Scientific Exploration publishes material consistent with the Society’s mission: to provide a professional forum for critical discussion of topics that are for various reasons ignored or studied inadequately within mainstream science, and to promote improved understanding of social and intellectual factors that limit the scope of scientific inquiry. Topics of interest cover a wide spectrum, ranging
from apparent anomalies in well-established disciplines to paradoxical phenomena that seem to belong to no established discipline, as well as philosophical issues about the connections among disciplines. The Journal publishes research articles, review articles, essays, commentaries, guest editorials, historical perspectives, obituaries, book reviews, and letters or commentaries pertaining to previously published material.
JSE: “Reprinted from “[title of article]”, Journal of Scientifi c Exploration, vol. [x], no. [xx], pp. [xx], published by the Society for Scientific Exploration

WORKSHOP ON RESONANCE, FLEXIBILITY

AND BIO-PROPULSION



Session 1: Vortex Formation Processes, Wake Structures and Swimming    Efficiency
Session 2: Tuning of Wake Structures and Propulsor Resonance Patterns
Session 3: Flexibility in Bio-Inspired and Biological Propulsion

Presentation topics:
  • Optimal vortex formation in biological propulsion
  • Flexible propulsors and thrust augmentation in jellyfish swimming
  • Effect of trailing-edge flexibility on efficiency of motion
  • Scaling of three dimensional effects in flapping propulsion
  • Resonance of the hydrodynamic wake at the most efficient flapping gait
  • Inviscid modeling of resonances in flapping fins
  • Flexibility and resonance in bio-propulsion
  • Insect and fish inspired locomotion for unconventional unmanned vehicles
  • Thin fin extremities for flexibility and control of efficient thrust generation
  • Influence of pectoral fin skeletal design on fin flexibility and propulsion
  • Construction patterns of biological propulsors

(This link is no longer available)   : (

Perfect !!  
What an absolutely perfect way to dip our toes into the preliminary testing-pool of speculation.  Reflective observation of 'systems' that we're already used to is the perfect starting-point.  Thank you all of the presen-ters and organisers of this day-long workshop: 


* Workshop on Resonance, Flexibility and Bio-propulsion
July 14, 2011 Princeton University

Welcome

The Workshop on Resonance, Flexibility and Bio-propulsion will be held on July 14, 2011 at Princeton University University, New Jersey, USA.

The goal of the workshop is to develop a number of new research directions that we believe are important for the future of this field. The general format will feature a limited number of 10 min talks with 15 mins discussion after each talk. These talks will be followed by a general discussion where we flesh out new research directions. At the end of the day, we will break and then reconvene for dinner and drinks to end the day. At the end of the workshop we aim to have a shared document with the titles and abstracts for a number of new proposals.

We hope that everyone will be able to join us! If you can't make it yourself, please send a postdoc or graduate student in your place. Please let us know if you will be attending as soon as possible.

Participation in this workshop is by invitation only. If you are invited please send, before June 17, the following information by email to Keith Moored (kmoored@princeton.edu):
  • Name, affiliation, email address
  • Title of proposed presentation
  • Any additional relevant information

Deadlines

Notice of intent to attendJune 17, 2011
Hotel reservation, recommended beforeJuly 1, 2011

Program

The program is now available for download at Schedule_Resonance.pdf (78 KB).

Location

The workshop will be held in Room J223 of the Engineering Quadrangle. Limited parking is available at the back of the Engineering Quadrangle (entrance from Olden Street). An interactive map of the campus is available at Princeton University map.

(And this one also has been taken down)



Modeling the Unsteady Flows of Biological and Bio-Inspired Systems

Speaker: Dr. Keith Moored
Princeton University
Date: Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Time: 4:00 pm
Place: MEC 341
Refreshments at 3:30PM in MEC 341
Abstract:
The use of autonomous underwater and aerial vehicles in law enforcement, marine surveying and military operations has seen enormous growth in the past ten years. However, the full potential of these devices has not yet been realized. Bio-inspired systems may offer the next-generation solutions that are fast, efficient, maneuverable, stealthy and have a broad operational range producing a multi-functional platform. There are two particular features of swimming and flying organisms that are of interest: (1) unsteady locomotion and (2) flexible appendages. This talk will discuss efforts to develop simple but realistic models for unsteady locomotion with flexible propulsors.
First, I will discuss the development of an advanced panel method with viscous corrections to study the physics of unsteady locomotion. As a biological focal point for the modeling, the performance and flow structure produced by batoid rays is examined, revealing how thrust and efficiency are connected to the structure of the wake. Second, the physical mechanisms that lead to efficient propulsion in unsteady flow systems are investigated using the concept of wake resonance theory. The theory is shown to agree with experiments on a three-dimensional bio-inspired propulsor. Furthermore, the theoretical framework identifies the physical conditions that lead to high efficiency, explains the presence of multiple peaks in the efficiency curves, and demonstrates that efficient propulsion can be achieved outside the reverse von Karman vortex street wake pattern.


Archived: Seminars
(Dec 2010 - March 2012)


Clara O'Farrell 

Graduate Student
Control and Dynamical Systems
California Institute of Technology 

Research Interests

I am interested in controls, dynamical systems, fluid dynamics, and (most importantly) in the intersection of these three. Clearly, these three interests could only converge on one thing: jellyfish. Why jellyfish? In John's words, jellyfish are "an integral component of ocean ecology and also represent one of the oldest forms of biological propulsion still in existence. Their simple morphology and body kinematics make them a promising candidate for studies aimed at uncovering design principles that have led to the success of these and more complex biological propulsion systems."
As an undegraduate, I worked on methods for identifying and tracking hairpin packets in direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, under the direction of Pino Martin at the CRoCCo Lab.
At the Dabiri Lab, I have worked on computing the Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) in biological and bio-inspired flows, and on applying LCS methods vortex dynamics problems in biological and ocean flows


PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS


  • A Lagrangian approach to identifying vortex pinch-off
C. O'Farrell and J. O. Dabiri (2010)
Chaos: an Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science 
Focus Issue on Lagrangian coherent structures in fluid flows Vol. 20, 017513 (pdf).

  • Chasing eddies and their wall signature in DNS data of turbulent boundary layers
C. O'Farrell and M. P. Martin (2009)
Journal of TurbulenceVol. 10, N 15.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS


  • The formation of vortex rings from elliptical nozzles
C. O'Farrell and J. O. Dabiri (2011)
Bulletin of the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting. November 20-22, Baltimore, MD.

  • Optimal vortex formation in biological propulsion
C. O'Farrell (2011)
Workshop on Resonance, Flexibility and Biopropulsion
Princeton University, Princeton NJ July 14 2011

  • Vortex 'pinch-off' in the Norbury and Pierrehumbert families of vortices
C. O'Farrell and J. O. Dabiri (2011)
Workshop on Coherent Structures in Dynamical Systems
Lorentz Center, Universiteit Leiden, The Netherlands May 16-20 2011

  • Vortex 'pinch-off' in the Norbury family of vortices
C. O'Farrell and J. O. Dabiri (2011)
Southern California Symposium on Flow Physics, University of Southern California, April 16.

  • The stability of a family of vortex rings
C. O'Farrell and J. O. Dabiri (2010)
Bulletin of the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting. November 21-23, Long Beach, CA.

  • Lagrangian coherent structures in the wake of an anguilliform swimmer
C. O'Farrell and J. O. Dabiri (2010)
Workshop on Natural Locomotion in Fluids and on Surfaces: Swimming, Flying and Sliding
Institute for Mathematics and its Applications, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN June 1-5 2010

  • A Lagrangian analysis of the wake of an anguilliform swimmer
C. O'Farrell and J. O. Dabiri (2010)
Southern California Symposium on Flow Physics, University of California, Irvine CA, April 17.

  • A Lagrangian approach to identifying vortex pinch-off
C. O'Farrell and J. O. Dabiri (2009)
Bulletin of the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting. November 22-24, Minneapolis, MN.

  • The wall signature of hairpin packets in turbulent boundary layers
C. O'Farrell, S. Priebe and M. P. Martin (2007)
Bulletin of the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting. November 18-20, Salt Lake City, UT.

Academic

Ph. D. in Control and Dynamical Systems
California Institute of Technology, in progress.

B.S.E. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Applications of Computing
Summa cum laude
Princeton University, 2008

Funding and awards 
NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, 2008. 
Betty and Gordon Moore Fellowship (Caltech), 2008-2009. 

CV


Media
"An eel's wake", Caltech Engineering&Science (e&s), Volume LXXIII Number 3

Contact
Control and Dynamical Systems
California Institute of Technology
1200 E California Blvd MC 107-81
Pasadena, CA 91125
ofarrell@cds.caltech.edu






CV  CLARA O'FARRELL

California Institute of Technology, Control and Dynamical Systems

1200 East California Boulevard
Mail Code 107-81
Pasadena, CA 91125
(626) 395-4462, ofarrell@cds.caltech.edu
http://www.cds.caltech.edu/ofarrell/


EDUCATION
2013 PhD in Control and Dynamical Systems (expected May 2013)
California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA
Adviser: John Dabiri
2008 B.S.E. summa cum laude in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Princeton University, Princeton NJ
Certicate in Applications of Computing
Thesis: Chasing Hairpin Packets and their Wall Signature in Turbulent Boundary Layers
Adviser: M. Pino Martn


RESEARCH EXPERIENCE
Research Assistant, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA (2009-present)
{ Applications of Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) to vortex dynamics problems in biological
ows
{ Adviser: John Dabiri
Research Assistant, Princeton University, Princeton NJ (2007-2008)
{ Algorithms and tools for identifying and tracking structures in hypersonic turbulent boundary
layers
{ Adviser: Pino Martn
Research Assistant, Instituto Tecnologico de Buenos Aires, Argentina (8/2008-9/2008)
{ FAA certication for a light aircraft design


PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS
1. O'Farrell, C. and Dabiri, J.O., \A Lagrangian approach to identiying vortex pinch-o," Chaos
20:017513 (2010)
2. O'Farrell, C. and Martn M.P., \Chasing eddies and their wall signature in DNS data of Turbulent
Boundary Layers," Journal of Turbalence 10:15 (2009)


CONFERENCES, WORKSHOPS
1. O'Farrell C. and Dabiri J.O., \Optimal vortex formation in biological propulsion." Workshop on
Resonance, Flexibility and Biopropulsion, Princeton University, Princeton NJ (July 2011)
2. O'Farrell C. and Dabiri J.O., \Vortex `pinch-o' in the Norbury and Pierrehumbert families of vor-
tices." Workshop on Coherent Structures in Dynamical Systems, Lorentz Center, Universiteit Leiden,
The Netherlands (May 2011)
3. O'Farrell C. and Dabiri J.O., \Vortex `pinch-o' in the Norbury family of vortices." Southern Cali-
fornia Symposium on Flow Physics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA (April 2011)
over &
4. O'Farrell C. and Dabiri J.O., \The stability of a family of vortex rings." 63rd Annual Meeting of
the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics, Long Beach CA (November 2010)
5. O'Farrell C. and Dabiri J.O., \Lagrangian Coherent Structures in the wake of an anguilliform swim-
mer." Workshop on Natural Locomotion in Fluids and on Surfaces, Institute for Mathematics and its
Applications, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN (June 2010)
6. O'Farrell C. and Dabiri J.O., \A Lagrangian analysis of the wake of an anguilliform swimmer."
Southern California Symposium on Flow Physics, University of California, Irvine CA (April 2010)
7. O'Farrell C. and Dabiri J.O., \A Lagrangian approach to identifying vortex pinch-o." 62nd Annual
Meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics, Minneapolis MN (November
2009)
8. O'Farrell C., Priebe S., and Martn M.P. , \The wall signature of hairpin packets in turbulent bound-
ary layers" 60th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics, Salt
Lake City UT (November 2007)


FELLOWSHIPS AND AWARDS
Graduate Fellowships
{ National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (2008-2012)
{ Betty and Gordon Moore Fellowship (California Institute of Technology, 2008-2009)
Research Achievement
{ Honorable Mention, Donald Janssen Dike Award for Undergraduate Research (Princeton Univer-
sity, June 2008)
{ Sigma Xi National Research Honor Society Book Award (Princeton University, June 2008)
Academic Achievement
{ Sau-Hai Lam *58 Prize in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Princeton University, 2008)
{ Harold T. Shapiro Prize for Academic Excellence (Princeton University, October 2006)


TEACHING EXPERIENCE
Teaching Assistant, ME 19ab Fluid Mechanics, Caltech, Pasadena, CA (Fall 2011/Winter 2012)
Guest Lecturer, Ae/BE 242 Biological Flows: Propulsion, Caltech, Pasadena, CA (Winter 2011)
High School Biology Teacher, Saint Andrew's Scots School, Buenos Aires, Argentina (6/2006-
8/2006)


OTHER SKILLS
SCUBA
{ Open-water (NAUI) certication (February 2010)
{ American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS) certied Scientic Diver (June 2010)




ANTI-GRAVITY

Anti-gravity is the idea of creating a place or object that is free from the force of gravity. It does not refer to the lack of weight under gravity experienced in free fall or orbit, or to balancing the force of gravity with some other force, such as electromagnetism or aerodynamic lift. Anti-gravity is a recurring concept in science fiction, particularly in the context of spacecraft propulsion. An early example is the gravity blocking substance "Cavorite" in H. G. WellsThe First Men in the Moon.

In Newton's law of universal gravitation, gravity was an external force transmitted by unknown means. In the 20th century, Newton's model was replaced by general relativity where gravity is not a force but the result of the geometry of space. Under general relativity, anti-gravity is impossible except under contrived circumstances.[1][2][3] Quantum physicists have postulated the existence of gravitons, a set of masslesselementary particles that transmit the force, and the possibility of creating or destroying these is unclear.

"Anti-gravity" is often used colloquially to refer to devices that look as if they reverse gravity even though they operate through other means, such as lifters, which fly in the air by using electromagnetic fields.[4][5]



An Integrated Study of Bio-inspired Flights

Speaker: Dr. Haibo Dong
Associate Professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering
Wright State University, Dayton, OH
Date: Thursday, April 5, 2012
Time: 4:00 pm
Place: MEC 341
Refreshments at 3:30PM in MEC 341
Abstract:
Developing a class of small-sized aircraft, usually referred as micro air vehicles (MAVs), based on the success of insect evolution can become overwhelming. Currently, there is a lack of physics-based analysis of flow modulation and force control in insect free flights. This is due to experimental and computational difficulty in studying multiple deformable control surfaces undergoing 6 DOF dynamic motions. In this talk, a novel method is introduced for studying unsteady flow and its reduced order modeling of bio-inspired flapping flights through an integrated experimental, computational, and theoretical approach. High-speed photogrammetry and accurate 3D data reconstruction are first used to measure the wing/body flexibility and kinematics of freely flying insects with extraordinary detail. An in-house, efficient Cartesian grid based immersed boundary solver is then used to simulate unsteady flows in all their complexity. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and a pressure-correction based Galerkin projection method are implemented to obtain reduced-order models of complex flow structures. Results from analyzing dragonflies in take-off maneuvers and canonical plates undergoing flapping motion have brought new insights into understanding fundamental flow physics of flapping wings and associated force production and control mechanisms.



billboard


Dr. Frank Fish presented the talk, “Hydrodynamic performance of the flippers of large-bodied cetaceans,” at the 6th Triennial Conference on Secondary Adaptation of Tetrapods to Life in Water, which was held in San Diego, CA, June 6-10, 2011.  The presentation was co-authored with P.W. Weber and L.E. Howle of Duke University; M.M. Murray of the U.S. Naval Academy; and J.S. Reidenberg of Mt. Sinai Hospital.  

He presented an invited paper, “Whales, windmills and wings that go bump in the night,” at the 5th Annual Biomimicry Education Summit, held in Cleveland, OH, June 27-29.  

He published the paper, “The tubercles on humpback whales’ flippers: Application of bio-inspired technology,” with P. Weber and L. Howle of Duke University and M.M. Murray of the U.S. Naval Academy, in the journal, Integrative and Comparative Biology, 2011, 51: 203-213.  

Professor Fish was the guest editor for the special issue of Marine Technology Society Journal.  He co-authored the article, “Biomimetics and marine technology: An introduction,” with Donna Kocak of HARRIS CapRock Communications in Marine Technology Society Journal,  45(4): 8-13 (2011).

He published the paper, “Batoid fishes: Inspiration for the next generation of underwater robots,” with K. Moored of Princeton and T. Kemp and H. Bart-Smith of the University of VA in Marine Technology Society Journal, 45(4): 99-109 (2011).

Another paper entitled “Marine applications of the biomimetic humpback whale flipper” appeared in Marine Technology Society Journal, 45(4): 198-207 (2011) with P. Weber and L. Howle of Duke University and M. Murray of the U.S. Naval Academy.

On July 14, Professor Fish made a presentation, “Thin fin extremities for flexibility and control of efficient thrust generation,” at the Workshop on Resonance, Flexibility and Bio-propulsion, which was held at Princeton.




Princeton University
Independent Work Projects or Senior Thesis research may result in a published paper with the student’s advisor. Here are some examples of student published papers:


 Localized Microwave Plasma Grid by Laser-Designation, AIAA-2011-4000, 42nd Plasmadynamics and Lasers Conference in conjunction with the 18th International Conference on MHD Energy Conversion (ICMHD), Honolulu, Hawaii (M.R. Edwards et al.)


 Design and Analysis of a Single-Stage Hypersonic Concept for Ultra-Rapid Global Travel, 15th AIAA International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference, April 2008, Dayton, Ohio, Paper No. AIAA 2008-2521, (J.B. Glass, A. Mackowski, S. Plucinski, S. Sherman, C.A. Teichner and A. Van Hoek, D. Cummins, T. Conbeer, R. Mellish, B. Vigil, J. Vogel, Z. Xia, and K. Bowcutt)


 Eddy Hunting in Compressible Boundary Layers using DNS Data, 59th APS Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting, November 2006, Tampa, Richdale, (G.C. Richdale, M.P. Martin, and D. Silver)
VII. FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS
Edgar Y. Choueiri
Spacecraft propulsion, plasma dynamics, astronautics, and space plasma physics.
Mikko Haataja
Research focuses on theoretical and computational materials science and physical biology. Current work includes studies of microstructure formation during solid-solid phase transformations, dislocation dynamics, mechanics of bulk metallic glasses, and evolving microstructures in biology.
Philip Holmes
Nonlinear dynamical systems, fundamental problems in the mechanics of solids, fluids and biological systems, and related mathematical methods. Current interests include neuro-mechanical models of insect locomotion and lamprey swimming; neural networks and brain modelling, including cognitive control and attention.




Chapter 17. Biomimetic Swimmer Inspired by the Manta Ray

Frank E . Fish, Hossein Haj-Hariri, Alexander J . Smits, Hilary Bart-Smithand Tetsuya Iwasaki
Citation Information
Biomimetics
Nature-Based Innovation
Yoseph Bar-Cohen
CRC Press 2011
Pages 495–523
Print ISBN: 978-1-4398-3476-3
eBook ISBN: 978-1-4398-3477-0

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